Author: AIA Ohio

Tax Expenditure Review Panel to Asses Historic Preservation Tax Credits et. al.

The new Tax Expenditure Review Committee, created to give ongoing scrutiny to foregone state revenue in the form of exemptions, deductions and other special exceptions in the tax code, has announced its first meeting and the first set of tax expenditures to go under the microscope. Historic preservation tax credits are included among many “tax expenditures.” After years of discussion among legislators and advocacy from outside groups across the political spectrum about the need for such reviews, lawmakers finally created the committee at the close of the previous General Assembly. Under the law, the committee consists of six legislators and the tax commissioner, and it must review every tax expenditure listed in the Ohio Department of Taxation’s (ODT) biennial tax expenditure report at least once every eight years. Sen. Scott Oelslager (R-North Canton), chair of the new committee and of the Senate Finance Committee, set an initial meeting for 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 11 in the Senate Finance Hearing Room, with the following five tax expenditures on the agenda: Sales to churches and certain other nonprofit organizations, ORC 5739.02(B)(12), Department of Tax Code 1.01 Sales to the state, any of its political subdivisions and certain other states, ORC 5739.02(B)(1), Department of Tax Code 1.02 Sales by churches and certain types of nonprofit organizations, ORC 5739.02(B)(9), Department of Tax Code 1.03 Tangible personal property used primarily in manufacturing tangible personal property, ORC 5739.02(B)(42)(g), Department of Tax Code 1.04 Packaging...

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Registration Board Review Bill Has Sponsor’s Hearing (SB255)

The State Government Oversight and Reform Committee took Sponsor’s testimony March 7 with regard to SB255 which would require “regular legislative oversight” of occupational licensing boards and reduce “onerous barriers” to entry in the workforce that some believe keep hard-working Ohioans sidelined. Sponsor Robert McColley noted the hours of training required to become a licensed cosmetologist, barber or auctioneer and contrasted it to the far lower number of training hours to become a licensed Emergency Medical Technician, saying these requirements are “unjustly burdensome on some professions more than others.” McColley also said the occupational licensing boards can act unilaterally on issues regarding issuance or revocation of licenses, fees, renewal processes and conduct rules. This kind of occupational regulation, he said, “is the antithesis of job creation” and requires well-intentioned people to “ask the government for a permission slip to simply earn a living.” He said that reducing licensure has bipartisan appeal, with support from the Heritage Foundation, Buckeye Institute and Brookings Institute and backing from the administrations of former President Barack Obama and President Donald Trump. The bill describes the board review process– the Legislative Service Commission (LSC) would: submit a public report on the board’s impact; create an official state policy on review of occupational licensing boards and regulations; require the chief of the Common Sense Initiative be notified of each board’s review and testify regarding the board’s effectiveness...

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House Sponsor Seeks Interior Design Licensing (HB 504)

Rep. Dorothy Pelanda asked fellow members of the House Economic Development, Commerce and Labor Committee to pass HB 504 which would provide a framework for the certification of interior designers in Ohio. During the February 27 hearing Rep. Pelanda said,“The intent of the legislation is to allow these professionals to practice and pursue their professional goals to their fullest capabilities while protecting the public, as well as retain talent and increase job creation in the state of Ohio,” The representative enumerated the six (6) Ohio universities that offer an accredited course of study in interior design and explained those who wish to practice interior design in Ohio “must record 3,520 hours of work experience with a National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) Certified Professional, or a Licensed Design Professional as direct supervisor, and be eligible for and successfully pass the NCIDQ examination.” Pelanda said interior designers are suffering “the unintended consequences of an older, overly broad, and under-inclusive state statute” which she said makes it difficult to compete if designers own their own businesses. “The legislation will not only create a long-term solution for job growth and retention, but it will define a profession that will align the state with the federal model of the Government Service Administration (GSA),” she said. Pelanda also went over some provisions of the bill and explained some items that would not be...

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Legislators Debut $2.6B Capital Budget

Lawmakers introduced the $2.6 billion capital budget for FY19-20 Monday, highlighting a $222 million portion dedicated to addiction and other health and human services purposes. Both chambers plan hearings this week on their respective measures — SB266 (Oelslager) and HB529 (Ryan) — as the General Assembly looks to make quick work of the bill. Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) told reporters Monday he hopes to finish work on the bill in the third week of March. The House version is expected to be the final vehicle. Obhof said the $222 million for health and human services projects is more than double what the previous capital budget allocated. Within that is a $20 million pool of money to be made available through competitive grants for “opioid community resiliency projects” that focus on youth. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (Ohio MHAS) will set rules for distributing that money. Other major funding allocations in the bills are as follows:  $600 million for school construction through the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission,  $483 million for universities and community colleges  $514 million for local infrastructure projects through the Ohio Public Works commission, including $100 million for the Clean Ohio program.  $234 million for parks, dams, trails, waterways and wildlife.  About $147 million for community projects. Obhof said school security upgrades are likely to be discussed as part of separate safety legislation....

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