Author: AIA Ohio

More Legislative Oversight Of Occupational Licensing Boards (HB289)?

State lawmakers on Oct. 18 outlined a proposal designed to limit unnecessary licensure for working in certain jobs, saying the state processes often create high barriers to entry. The bill sponsors, Rep. Ron Hood (R-Ashville) and Rep. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon), told the House Government Accountability & Oversight Committee that the bill, HB 289, would give the legislature more oversight of occupational licensing boards.  The measure would also create a framework for alternatives to occupational licensure while protecting public health and safety, they said. “In this legislature, we often talk about how we can help foster job creation. Frankly, occupational regulation is the antithesis of job creation,” Rep. Hood said. “It creates a situation where well-intentioned people must go, hat in hand, to the government and ask for a permission slip to simply earn a living. It makes obtaining a job in that field even more difficult and contributes to the unemployment rate.” The proposal creates a process similar to a fiscal note that would educate the public on licensure changes. The bill proposes that every occupational licensing board would automatically sunset at the end of five years unless renewed by the legislature.  “Understand, this does not mean that these boards will necessarily be disbanded, only that they must be reviewed,” Rep. McColley said. “It is quite possible, and I would hope probable, that some existing licensure requirements can be modified to be less restrictive,...

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Joint Committee Begins Review of State’s Tax Expenditures (including Historic Preservation Tax Credit)

Tax Commissioner Joe Testa was the lone sponsor Tuesday at the first meeting of the latest group charged with studying Ohio’s tax expenditures — more popularly known as “tax loopholes.” Led by Sen. Scott Oelslager (R-Canton) and including Sens. John Eklund (R-Chardon) and Vern Sykes (D-Akron) and Reps. Tim Schaffer (R-Lancaster), Gary Scherer (R-Circleville) and John Rogers (D-Mentor-on-the-Lake), this committee was pointed to by the 2020 Tax Policy Study Commission as key in the state’s potential move toward a flat tax. Testa told the committee that Ohio’s existing tax expenditures currently total over $9 billion in foregone annual revenue with the approximately 100-plus tax expenditures “seldom subject to formal review.” However, under current law, each tax expenditure is to be reviewed “at least once every eight years.” Testa defined a “tax expenditure” as “a legislated variation from — more commonly a reduction to — a standardized tax base. … [Specifically], Ohio law defines a tax expenditure to mean a tax provision in the Ohio Revised Code (ORC) that exempts, either in whole or in part, certain persons, income, goods, services or property from the effect of taxes established in the ORC, including, but not limited to tax deductions, exemptions, deferrals, exclusions, allowances, credits, reimbursements and preferential tax rates.” He noted they often remain in law “without a pre-determined termination date.” Testa referenced the biennial summary of the state’s tax...

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Kasich Appoints BBS and Building Appeals Board Members

Board of Building Appeals: Neil J. Giering of Garfield Hts. (Cuyahoga Co.) was reappointed for a term beginning Oct. 13 and ending Oct. 13, 2021. Board of Building Standards: Donald B. Leach, Jr. of Columbus (Franklin Co.), Terence M. McCafferty of Seven Hills (Cuyahoga Co.), Donald R. McIlroy of Circleville (Pickaway Co.), Christopher L. Miller of Dublin (Franklin Co.), John N. Pavlis of North Canton (Stark Co.), Carl Schultz of Delaware (Delaware Co.), and A. Bailey Stanbery of Toledo (Lucas Co.)were reappointed for terms beginning Oct. 14 and ending Oct. 13,...

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Historic Tax Credits Axed by House Ways and Means

The time to act is right now!  As we have been expecting, the House Ways and Means Committee has removed historic tax credits, during the tax reform process. We are in a national campaign to Save Historic Tax Credits.  Everyone who has used these credits or benefited from these credits needs to act now. We realize the importance of national tax reform. But we also think the tax credits that work for American communities, which have proven to provide a positive return should be retained. In Ohio the impact of historic tax credits has been truly phenomenal. In Ohio 1976-2016 there have been 1,898 completed projects = Total Investment $4,091,824,967 In Ohio 2012-2016 Total Rehabilitation Costs $1,392 billion In Ohio 2012-2016 historic tax credit projects created 24,616 Jobs The risk is assumed 100% by the private sector, the credit is not taken until 100% certified completion. We have seen spectacular results in Ohio’s small towns: Chillicothe to Painesville, mid-sized towns Hamilton to Canton, and the biggest cities: Cincinnati to Cleveland economies have been transformed by historic tax credits. Please Contact Your congressman Senator Rob Portman Congressmen Tiberi and Renacci, members of House Ways and Means Committee Ask them to put Historic Tax Credits back in, tell your story, tell what you’ve seen and experienced, let them know this is a vital tool for Ohio.  It allows Ohio communities to compete with coast for talent, and investments. Share this with everyone on your team and with other community members. To be successful we need...

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USGBC Recognizes OFCC Leadership in Environmentally-Friendly School Construction

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) recently recognized Ohio for having more LEED-certified K-12 schools than any other state in the country. LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the world’s most widely used green building rating system. USGBC, the creators of LEED, honored the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission (OFCC) for assisting more than 300 K-12 buildings across the state to achieve LEED certification. That number makes Ohio the nationwide leader in K-12 sustainable construction, well ahead of second-place California with 121 LEED certified schools. The recognition was presented to OFCC Executive Director David Williamson at USGBC’s Design Columbus Education Day, held at Ohio State University. Williamson noted that this has been a 10-year process for the commission, which first mandated the use of environmentally friendly design techniques in state-funded K-12 projects back in 2007. “Our commission has always stressed innovation and new ideas into our program,” Williamson added. “We believe that our efforts in this area have yielded both environmental benefits and operational cost savings for public owners in Ohio. We look forward to our continued work with USGBC in this vital area.” Ohio’s LEED-certified schools are designed to be more energy efficient, save money and reduce resource consumption. Buildings in OFCC-funded LEED projects are designed, on average, to be 33 percent more energy efficient, reduce potable water consumption by 35 percent, and provide healthier learning...

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